Fiction Writers Who Are Prepared To Self-Publish AND Self-Market: Get Moving!

If you’re an aspiring novelist, please read and consider the following posts.

AS OF JANUARY 2011, THINGS ARE NOT LOOKING GOOD FOR TRADITIONAL PUBLISHERS OR BOOKSTORES

CURRENTLY AT AMAZON.COM, GENRE EBOOKS BY UNCONNECTED NOVELISTS ARE SELLING AS WELL AS WORKS BY ESTABLISHED, TRADITIONALLY-PUBLISHED AUTHORS

See the following posts over at J.A. Konrath’s blog (A Newbie’s Guide to Publishing). He’s changed his mind from his earlier position, and is now strongly in favor of self-publishing. One way to see these posts is to simply read the posts from his blog from December 27, 2010 through January 7, 2011. Here are the separate links:

Your mileage may vary, but all aspiring genre fiction writers should look into this! In the past, I was strongly against fiction writers self-publishing if they hadn’t already gotten some form of recognition from the traditional publishing industry. This was due to the stigma against self-published books within the industry.

However, after the past year, the traditional publishing industry currently appears to be on its knees. And at the same time, totally unconnected newbies are selling quite well in the genre ebook niches on Amazon.com. So, the equation has changed. The stigma still exists, but depending on one’s goals as a writer, it might not matter anymore. In any event, one resource you might want to check out is Are You Still Submitting Your Work To a Traditional Publisher?

Tagged as:  ·

37 Responses to “Fiction Writers Who Are Prepared To Self-Publish AND Self-Market: Get Moving!”

  1. Valerie M says:

    If you are not a writer, I suspect there is also a bigger opportunity to freelance as an ebook/self-publishing book designer or editor. As the self-publishing industry grows and competition gets stiffer, the authors’ works are going to have to be on point. I also see a bigger market for writing consultants and ghost writers to help streamline the content ideas.

    I’ve bought several ebooks and some of them, while the content may be great, are atrocious with the editing and the designs. So far, that hasn’t stopped the ebooks from selling but I don’t think that will be the case for long.

    • LMH says:

      I agree and this is such a timely article. I have been reading ebooks for the past 12 months and have found that the editing and design is often distracting. I have also noticed that most unfavorable reviews mention the design & editing shortcomings. Just this week I decided to compile a list of obvious self-publishers and at least see if they are in the market for line editors.

  2. ValerieM.,

    Thank you for pointing out some things that are extremely important for anybody looking to create additional income streams:

    (1) New, “booming” opportunities in an industry segment usually create parallel “booms” in related fields that service that particular segment. I was extremely interested to note that Mr. Konrath has buttons and links to his ebook designer and print cover designer in the sidebar at his blog. I’m sure they’re getting plenty of business from the aspiring self-publishing writers who read his blog. Good for them!

    (2) We have to try to be flexible in our thinking in order to seize the maximum number of opportunities. In general, the writing biz posts don’t get as much attention as others. In part, because I suspect that some readers automatically assume it has nothing to do with them. However, as you’ve pointed out, these trends have a LOT to do with the emerging fortunes of people who have the following skill sets: ebook designers, editors, researchers, ghost writers and a bunch of other folks who provide services that many self-publishing writers would be interested in.

    A savvy person with these types of skills would start visiting and commenting at aspiring/newbie authors’ blogs (if they haven’t already been doing so), and start positioning themselves to offer their services to that emerging market.

    *Addendum*
    It occurs to me that a savvy person who doesn’t already have one of these skills might consider learning one of these skills to develop an additional, freelance income stream. Take a few editing classes (or reference librarian classes in terms of learning how to do professional research) at a local (junior or 4-year) college, get some experience through whatever internship program the college might have, and then start freelancing on the side.

    Expect Success!

    • palmwater says:

      Thank you for providing this post and the listed resources.

      New, “booming” opportunities in an industry segment usually create parallel “booms” in related fields that service that particular segment.

      There are lots of opportunities for people who are creative as well as people with good technical skills. With audiobook sales on the rise, there is room for people who know how to create podcasts and convert them to mp3 format, as well as to do “voice” work. Not every author has a nice voice, but if you have one there are opportunities to create in ebooks.

      There is also opportunity for people who can help in the promotion/branding of these self published books, such as graphic designers, web developers, video creators. people who are good at personal branding/consulting.

      I never paid much attention to these posts for the reason you mentioned Khadjia. However I have been making lots of changes, and learning new skills to create additional income.

    • Joyousnerd says:

      That is an excellent point Khadija. Even if you aren’t in the position to start doing that kind of work right this second, that doesn’t mean that you can’t put yourself in the position where you could get started.

      I’ve stumbled into things by just reading about them even when I wasn’t necessarily able to jump in and start doing them right away. It may be easier to get started than you think, or you may come across another neat idea while you research.

      Quote from my inspirational calendar:
      “A large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life, by him who interests his heart in everything.”

    • Palmwater,

      You’re welcome! You said, “There are lots of opportunities for people who are creative as well as people with good technical skills. With audiobook sales on the rise, there is room for people who know how to create podcasts and convert them to mp3 format, as well as to do “voice” work. Not every author has a nice voice, but if you have one there are opportunities to create in ebooks.

      There is also opportunity for people who can help in the promotion/branding of these self published books, such as graphic designers, web developers, video creators. people who are good at personal branding/consulting.”

      Oh yeah! I believe that once more aspiring authors get hip to what’s going on, the numbers of self-publishing novelists will explode. And the people who are wise enough to position themselves to ride this wave from the beginning will do quite well for themselves.

      You said, “I never paid much attention to these posts for the reason you mentioned Khadjia. However I have been making lots of changes, and learning new skills to create additional income.”

      Across the board, I’m trying to encourage more BW to retrain our thinking away from making unnecessary, option-limiting assumptions about things. Unfortunately, as I’ll mention in an upcoming post, the vast majority of the American people will fall into categories called The Losers & The Left Behinds. In particular, AAs will be left behind to die in this economy. A way to avoid being left behind is to learn how to think the way enterprising types of immigrants think: constantly open to investigating profitable opportunities. That’s going to be the only way to thrive in the future.
      _________________________________________________

      JoyousNerd,

      You said, “Even if you aren’t in the position to start doing that kind of work right this second, that doesn’t mean that you can’t put yourself in the position where you could get started.”

      Exactly! And let me take this opportunity to point out something else:

      I notice that, for whatever combination of reasons, most AAs don’t bother to update or refresh their skill set. Adding to our skill sets almost never occurs to most AAs. That is—not until AFTER we get laid off from our “good jobs.” This apathy about updating and increasting our skill sets is a mindset that will ensure that even most AA professionals ALSO get left behind in this economy!

      I stumbled across a very disturbing blog the other day. Subprime JD. It’s dedicated to angry law school graduates who are broke and drowning in student loan debt. What they’re talking about at that blog is REAL.

      Expect Success!

      • Oshun/Aphrodite says:

        That is interesting about the attorneys. There are a lot of things they can do – bc they are attorneys in fields not even related to law.

      • Karen says:

        This is an issue that is never discussed at the high school level. What is the ROI for a college degree? I did this very roughly in my senior year in high school. What could I afford (including student loans) versus earning potential and how long it would take to pay off those loans. Anything that would take more than 5 years to pay back was off the table.

        This meant that I review what the career and earning projections were for my chosen field. Another factor was whether my chosen field at the time was over or underrepresented.

        In the “Age of Turmoil” such aspects are even more critical to assess.

        • Oshun/Aphrodite says:

          You are correct. This never happens. If something so simple were to be required I know people would make different choices.

        • APA says:

          This is something that I’ve always thought about from the very beginning, which is why I chose the full-ride to my state’s flagship school rather than pay $40,000+ per year to go to a more prestigious university.

          It’s really crazy that students are amassing $150,000 in debt just for their undergraduate degree. I know a girl who already has $70,000 in loans for undergrad and is planning on going to law school in the future. She is under the impression that she is going to make tons of money with her JD, so she doesn’t need to be concerned about debt. I wonder if it ever occurs to people that $150,000 is a mortgage in some parts of the country.

          In addition, it’s not the school that makes the person. My friends that chose to pay more for a prestigious degree haven’t achieved more than I have. In fact, many of them are returning to our state school to pursue their professional degrees. When in reality, it would be more beneficial to get the undergraduate degree for free and then pay to get their professional degree at a more prestigious institution.

  3. vonnie says:

    awesome information! i am in the process of writing my book, but looking to be an ebook editor sounds extremely appealing. always something to ponder from your site, Khadija :) Thanks

  4. Oshun/Aphrodite says:

    I agree. I am not a fiction writer, but I love content – especially when I have the extra money and especially when its new/different.

    I think stuff like this levels the playing field when it comes to exchanging ideas and disseminating information.

    Traditional publishers/media outlets etc cherry pick and shape what goes out to the public, but this is wide open.

    @ Valerie great idea. And I think the concept is applicable to other industries as well.

    Great thoughts.

  5. medley says:

    Interesting and timely article. I am a primarily a fiction writer who is (as yet) unpublished. I am a published poet. The self-publishing route was looked down upon in earlier years as “vanity publishing”. Works of questionable merit being put into print
    because no legitimate house would publish them. My main concern with going the e-book route – or ebook route, initially – is reprint rights and intellectual property rights. In other words, how safe is it, epecially for an unestablished author?

    • Oshun/Aphrodite says:

      As long as your stuff is copywritten – no worries. Most countries respect IP laws (China and a few others have some issues), but you can’t be afraid to jump in…

      I used to be afraid to jump in, but not anymore. I don’t think there will be widespread stealing of your work. Just my opinion. People may share, but Kindle if I remember correctly has an option that you can select where your work can’t even be shared among devices owned by the same person.

      I have one nonfiction book published. Its on Lulu, Kindle, and I sell password protected copies via my website.

      The thing is my book is soo (niche) I can’t imagine anyone wanting to rip it off. If a reader shared it – that could still be good for me bc I have (sneaky service adverts) for my website/blog in the book which hopefully will make them want to check out those sites – look them up get enaged by the articles/blog posts and make other purchases.

      For me I put my heart into the book and I care, but I now see the book as another way to sell services and maybe products in the future to the book buyers.

    • This is something very important and a MAJOR concern. My books are pirated regularly, and the process for getting them off the pirate sites is onerous and arduous. I’ve dealt with situations where I’ve had to send out copyright notices 10-15 times per book in one day. No one respects copyright rights. Most of the pirate sites are located in countries outside the United States, and when Congress moves to do something, people get angry about it. My first e-book came out in September 2008. Before the week was out it was up on pirate sites and had already been downloaded over a hundred times. A typical e-book sells 200-300 copies in the first month. The numbers fall off sharply after that. If you sell 1k in a year you’re a rock star. If you’ve invested roughly $1k (editing, formatting, cover art, ISBN, etc…) in getting the book ready for publication, well, you can see that the hit is big and nasty. (Note, this is for romantic/erotic fiction. I can’t speak for other genres.)

      Right now I’m being stalked by a pirate who took umbrage with the fact that I requested that books she’d posted on a pirate site be taken down. So she posted ALL my books on that site. It took me a solid week to get them all taken down. The hoops you have to jump through are absolutely absurd. You have to give your full name, address and real email address to the pirate site. One person I know complained to google about hosting pirate sites and they responded with a long letter warning the author that SHE could be sued for libel for referring to the site as a pirate site.

      This is part of the cost of doing business and should definitely be factored in. If you sell a lot of books it’s probably not as painful, but if you don’t sell a lot, yeah, it’s quite painful.

      • Roslyn,

        Lord have mercy…{shaking my head in disgusted amazement}

        Expect Success!

      • medley says:

        Goodness! This is where having the backing of a publishing house has its advantages. They have a whole team of lawyers to make sure copyrights are adhered to…The trouble is the difficulty in getting signed onto said house in the first place. Something to mull over on the journey to becoming a published arthur.

      • Oshun/Aphrodite says:

        Thank you for shedding more light on this Roslyn. I am knocking on wood right now.

        I thought that other countries had to respect the Berne Convention – so its shocking to me all the hoops you have to go through despite the servers being located outside the US.

        • We might be making some progress in this area. A lot of the pirate sites host pirated movies and computer software as well. Some of the big studios are coming after them with a vengeance and petitioning Congress to shut the sites down. Right now ICE is seizing their domains and harassing the living daylights out of them. Congress is trying to pass COICA which would give Homeland Security the power to seize the domains and literally remove the sites from the internet if they’re found to have counterfeited or pirated merchandise on the site.

          Also keep in mind that there are vendors on ebay who burn ebooks to CDs and sell them on the ebay site. Ebay has a rule that you can only sell books if you own the copyright, so they claim to own it, when in fact they don’t. So you have the fun of playing wack-a-mole to get the products removed.

          And this is when I discovered that I’m not a liberal, or even progressive. When they posted about this on the Huffington Post there was all this hue and cry about free speech rights. I’m sorry, but there is no right to steal my property anywhere in the Constitution. What about my rights? They also went on and on about the “greedy filmmakers” and authors with yachts trying to “stick it to the little guy.” Uh, I don’t have a yacht, and I’m not a mega-corporation. I’m the sole copyright holder for my books and no one is going to protect my copyright which is both my legacy to my children and part of my retirement plan.

          They went on and on about how such sites as YouTube and Ebay will be affected. And well they should be. It never occurs to these people that nobody is going to write a book or anything else if they can’t make any money off them. It takes me anywhere from 6 months to a year to write a book. Why on earth would I invest that kind of time in the process for free?

          Be sure to write your member of congress in support of COICA. Read more about it here:
          http://www.fightonlinetheft.com/mediaroom.html

  6. Evelyn says:

    It might be a bit of a stretch to say this, but my opinion is that traditional publishing (of fiction books especially) – which is to say, printed hardcovers and paperbacks – is going the way of the dinosaur. I really think this because:

    – of the impact of the recession: people nowadays just have less money to spend in general, and unless you’re a die-hard avid reader or book collector, your hard-earned pennies aren’t going to be spent at Barnes and Noble. Not while there are public libraries and comfy chairs (and Starbucks!) built into Barnes Noble. And not while most people only ever read a particular book once and move on. Fiction books (even the really really good ones) aren’t really an investment that you can expect a return on.

    – the advance of information technology: CD sales started crashing when mp3 players were invented, and iTunes turned the market on its head, just to name one example. You can watch TV and movies online and on your phones and portable what-have-yous, so why wouldn’t books be the same deal? Now we have e-readers and iPads, e-books are available for quick download, and people are becoming very used to having information and entertainment at their fingertips in the blink of an eye. We’re also being spoiled by having so much selection presented to us so quickly – as opposed to sifting through the racks for an eye-catching title to take a chance on buying at your favorite bookstore.

    – the dumbing down of society: sad, but I think it’s true. I love to read, but I don’t know many others my age like me (just for my argument’s sake, I’m 27). And the generations after mine aren’t really being trained to love reading, either – it takes time, concentration, and using your imagination to enjoy a book, and nowadays most other forms of entertainment are charged up, don’t require you to think, and appeal to your senses (e.g. video games, candid reality TV shows, etc.). Which isn’t to knock those things, they can be okay in moderation and some are quality, but hopefully you get my drift. On the other hand, those of us who grew up reading and loving it may still want to, but the demands on our time and resources are mounting – for example, many of us are working longer hours or more than one job to pay increasing bills – and we just can’t afford the break it requires to delve into a good, long book. And for those of us who grew up reading and hated it, now there are alternatives and you really don’t have to do it so much anymore, LOL.

    Books won’t completely die out (after all, CDs and DVDs still sell), but I think we’re definitely seeing the last of the J.K. Rowling or John Grisham-level stories. I think soon it might even be that writers are saying ”I’m a writer and (insert daytime profession)” as the norm.

    • Oshun/Aphrodite says:

      “The advance of information technology: CD sales started crashing when mp3 players were invented, and iTunes turned the market on its head, just to name one example. You can watch TV and movies online and on your phones and portable what-have-yous, so why wouldn’t books be the same deal? Now we have e-readers and iPads, e-books are available for quick download, and people are becoming very used to having information and entertainment at their fingertips in the blink of an eye.”

      Guilty as charged.

  7. Angelyca says:

    Valerie, I also see that working as a writing consultant or ghostwriting for would be a worthwhile and potentially lucrative business opportunity. Copy-editing and creating tasteful and eye-catching designs will also be in that market I suspect.

    Just a week or so ago I commented to myself that I could definitely make a job of copy-editing blogs for some blog authors. Too often I believe poorly structured essays, poor grammar and spelling takes away from the message of the blog. Of course, I don’t know how realistic such a job would be (especially with my hands full with my studies!).

    Khadijah, I am a long time reader of your blog. I’ve purchased and recommended your book to a few ladies in my family. Thank you for all your work.

    Since I was in middle school I would write short high-fantasy fiction stories. You should see my old bookshelf at my parent’s house. Full of folders with hand-written and typed stories! Although I began pursuing a doctorate in the sciences just after college I’ve often wanted to write on the side. After checking out these links you’ve provided, I will seriously begin putting myself on track to this goal.

    • Neecy says:

      Angelyca,

      I can tell you that is one of the reasons i have shyed away from blogging. My writing is really bad. And although I have great ideas I don’t always articulate them in the most concise and clear manner.

      it never occurred to me that i could hire a copy editor to help clean up my essay and message. hmmm. I’d pay another likeminded BW for that. it would be well worth it. hmmmmm.

  8. Vonnie,

    You’re welcome! :-)
    ______________________________________________________

    Oshun/Aphrodite,

    You said, “I think stuff like this levels the playing field when it comes to exchanging ideas and disseminating information. Traditional publishers/media outlets etc cherry pick and shape what goes out to the public, but this is wide open.”

    Yes, that’s what makes all of this so exciting! {smile}
    ______________________________________________________

    Medley,

    You said, “My main concern with going the e-book route – or ebook route, initially – is reprint rights and intellectual property rights. In other words, how safe is it, epecially for an unestablished author?”

    Let me emphasize that this is NOT my area of practice, and I know nothing about intellectual property law. For detailed, personalized advice, one would need to consult an attorney who practices in that area.

    Nevertheless, my impression was that a large group of folks that Mr. Konrath is encouraging to self-publish are aspiring authors who don’t have any agents or books contracts. Meaning folks who have never given away/traded away any of the rights to their stories. Because they’ve never had any involvement with industry folks—again, meaning they NEVER had an agent or a book contract of any sort. And have also never had the story/book they want to self-publish previously published by anybody else (for example, in an anthology, etc.).

    For more detailed discussion of those sorts of nuances, you might want to read through the conversations over at Mr. Konrath’s blog. I vaguely recall at least one commenter bringing up a similar question during the conversation about at least one of those recent blog posts I linked to.
    _______________________________________________________

    Evelyn,

    My guess is that the hardcovers will go the way of the dinosaurs. I figure the paperbacks (as in the print-on-demand type for every book that’s not a Harry Potter-style blockbuster) will persist. Unlike the 45 record, cassette tape, or VHS videotape, a lot of folks have emotional attachments to the physical feel of reading a physical book. I’d guess that a large chunk of the avid reader group of people feel like this.

    On the other hand, I vaguely recall seeing some statistic somewhere that showed that the sort of folks who buy e-readers will buy many, many more books in a year than the “typical” American. I wonder how many Kindle and Nook owners are like me—consumers who enjoy experimenting with writers whose work I’m not familiar with by buying Amazon’s 99¢ and $2.99 ebooks (I just started reading and enjoying Velocity by B.V. Larson, whose site is “dedicated to the ebook publishing revolution”).

    I’m only willing to experiment like that for $2.99 or less. I rarely experiment with buying a physical paperback from a writer I’m unfamiliar with that costs the typical $7.99+. And I almost never buy new hardcover books (no matter who it’s by, or what it is).
    ____________________________________________________

    Angelyca,

    You’re welcome, and thank you for your support! You said, “Although I began pursuing a doctorate in the sciences just after college I’ve often wanted to write on the side. After checking out these links you’ve provided, I will seriously begin putting myself on track to this goal.”

    Great! I’m delighted to hear that!
    ____________________________________________________

    Faith,

    Thanks for the info!

    Expect Success!

  9. Rhonda says:

    The 7 Secrets of an Indie Editor

    Here is some of the post for you:

    Many years ago, when I was a starving writer wrestling day and night with the phenomenal angel of the fiction craft, I got thrown on my back a lot. I’d lie there wheezing until I could breathe again, then I’d gamely hop back up and go at it again.

    Wrestle! Wham. Breathe. Up. Wrestle! Wham. Breathe. This went on for a really long time.

    So now that I’m a professional indie editor, I know what’s going on at your house. And there are things I’ve learned about this craft that could make this wrestling match a whole lot easier on you. These are my secrets, the things you should know:

    1. You need far more discipline and profound human compassion than you think.

    2. Writing fiction isn’t expressing yourself, it’s creating an experience for your reader.

    And yet we all write because we love it. Right? I’m not sitting here at my desk thinking about you. I’m actually sitting here thinking about me, about the fact that I know something important and I want you to get a kick out of learning it from me.

    Which leads me inevitably to admit that the reader is the only one in this relationship who counts…

    • Rhonda,

      Thanks for the info! Following the linked post back to the post writer’s blog led to this scathing analysis of the Publisher Weekly 2009 bestseller list. She makes a lot of good points while taking a clear look at the numbers and names with that list:

      In particular, take a good, hard look at the author names in the top thirty hardback fiction sellers:

      Dan Brown. John Grisham. Kathryn Stockett. James Patterson. Nicholas Sparks. John Grisham. Janet Evanovich. Stephenie Meyer. Stephen King. Michael Crichton. Patricia Cornwell. Sue Grafton. Patricia Cornwell. Alyson Noel. James Patterson. Clive Cussler with Dirk Cussler. Pat Conroy. James Patterson. David Baldacci. James Patterson. Vince Flynn. James Patterson. Nora Roberts. Dean Koontz. Charlaine Harris. Danielle Steel. David Baldacci. Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson. Clive Cussler. Mary Higgins Clark.

      . . . Look at them in the context of top mass market paperback sellers:

      John Grisham. James Patterson. James Patterson. Nora Roberts. Janet Evanovich. James Patterson. Patricia Cornwell. David Baldacci. David Baldacci. Debbie Macomber. Debbie Macomber. Iris Johansen. James Patterson. Patricia Cornwell. James Patterson. Dean Koontz. Charlaine Harris. Nicholas Sparks. Janet Evanovich. Catherine Coulter. Mary Higgins Clark. Charlaine Harris. Janet Evanovich. James Rollins. Iris Johansen.

      Only four new names out of twenty-five, and all the rest straight off the hardback best sellers list (yes, twenty-one repeats!).

      . . . What does this tell us, folks?

      First and foremost, it tells us that the top 44 1/2 million books sold in the U.S. in 2009 were all written by the same tiny handful of twenty-six people.

      . . . You read it right: that’s 26 writers responsible for the vast, vast bulk of what sells in this country, barely two dozen human beings, all of whom have been on this list many, many times before throughout careers spanning decades, the majority of them already established best sellers long before the publishing industry turned into the Mr. Hyde it so recently turned into.

      Only one lonely little writer who has, apparently, never appeared on this list before. ONE.

      . . . What else does this list tell us?

      Well, American readers really like series protagonists. They like reading about the same character over and over and over and over again. Does this character change and grow throughout the series? Not really. Otherwise they’d lose their ability to placate their legions of hypnotized readers. They’d have to age, make choices, settle down into lifestyles, eventually get old and start dealing with health issues. . .and it’d no longer be the same old story happening repeatedly forever.

      Also, American readers REALLY like thrillers. Technothrillers, political thrillers, horror/suspense thrillers, puzzle thrillers, murder mystery and crime thrillers, even bounty hunter thrillers. Anything that makes your hair stand on end. Not only must it be the same old character and the same old story, but it must be the same old freaky story.

      Give us a series of novels—not even well-written ones—about the same character going through the same kinds of thrillers over and over and over again, and we’ll mortgage the farm for ya. You bet.

      If you can’t do that, then give us a series of novels—ditto—about the same character over an over and over again, only paranormal.

      Or novels—ditto—about rich people getting laid….

      One nice thing about the emerging self-published ebook revolution is that gives other writers an enhanced opportunity to break through the situation Ms. Mixon describes in her post. Thank goodness. I also say that as a reader.

      Expect Success!

      • LorMarie says:

        I noticed that with Dan Brown. Same old protagonist who encounters a young woman whose father was into somethijng weird.

        I’d love to sel-publish my work but my biggest concern is the quality of my fiction. I need to really make sure that it is a good piece of writing. If I were only going to publish nonfiction, I’d trust my own editing. With fiction I’m not as confident. I’m currently working on an erotic fiction short that I’m hoping to publish.

  10. Tee says:

    Khadija:

    Thank you for posting this information. There were a lot of aspects of self publishing opportunities that I did not consider. A few years ago I studied voice-over acting, and have always wanted to do voice-over for children’s literature. Thanks to your post, a light went on in my head!!!

    I have several completed manuscripts that I’m going to dust off, and get my entrepreneur gears grinding!!!

    Awesome post!

  11. Melissa Q says:

    Also if you can use pseudonyms if you are pumping out many works, like romance novels. Many authors have used this technique for the various types of works they put out.

  12. palmwater says:

    I found some good resources for sojourners’s looking for freelance writing work. There are many websites that provide freelance work from companies and individuals around the world. Of course these sites require the proper vetting! freelancer.com is a site that has a lot of job listings but it has some problems that I take issue with. However with the right vetting you can make some extra income. Thankfully, I also fund Lisa A. Martin’s blog and she has written some posts about freelancer.com and how to vet the job listings.

    Lisa’s blog is also great because she writes about her experience as a copywriter, and her experience with various freelance job listing websites.

    http://lisaamartin.wordpress.com/